First King On Earth

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John R. Salverda Writes:

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isn’t it funny how we never seem to associate Atlas with Atlantis (even though he was said to have been its first king, and the place was named for him). The two stories, as separate accounts, don’t seem to ring a bell with people. Atlantis was just an ancient idealized civilization that had a series of ten kings before it was washed away in a massive aqueous cataclysm; it is seldom compared with the Scriptural pre-flood civilization. While Atlas was just an ancient gardener who, in Greek myths, had a wife after whom the garden was named; there was a special tree with “golden” fruits; people who weren’t supposed to pick from the tree did so; there was an expulsion and a serpent was placed to guard the way to the tree. Also, in a story that is apparently unrelated to the garden story, Atlas rebelled against god (Zeus) and was punished by becoming the mountain that keeps Heaven away from the Earth. However, taken together the two accounts do seem to weave a very much more familiar story.

Once we recognize Atlas as Adam, we can use this same recognition when we look at the whole series of myths, having to do with the characters who are related to him, in the mythic genealogies. The mythic motifs of Prometheus, the brother of Atlas, are full of possible references to the writings of Moses, Exodus (the wandering Io) as well as Genesis (the creation of man from clay). Epimetheus, another brother of Atlas, was the husband of the world’s first woman, Pandora who introduced evil into the world by disobeying an order she was given. And Iapetus, the father of Atlas, Prometheus, and Epimetheus, is recognizable as Japheth.

Furthermore, just because we may see Atlas and Atlantis as Adam and the antediluvian world, doesn’t necessarily relegate our theory about its location to the Atlantic Ocean only. The western emplacement of Atlantis seems to be a more recent convention. The father and brother of Atlas, Iapetus and Prometheus for instance, are associated more with Cappadocia and the Caucasus respectively. And Atlas, as Mount Sinai would certainly tend to preclude his supposed Western Africa location.

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2 thoughts on “First King On Earth

  1. John R. Salverda, how do square calling Atlas Adam and then go on to refer to “Iapetus, the father of Atlas, Prometheus, and Epimetheus, … recognizable as Japheth [the son of Noah!]”?

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      Here’s one for Bob about “Eden in Greek Myths”

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      John Salverda

      3 Mar (5 days ago)

      Dear Bob, I have been critical, and then a bit conciliatory, but now I will t…

      8 older messages

      Damien Mackey AMAIC

      10:19 (1 hour ago)

      [image] Michael Gregorek https://www.facebook.com/gregorek michael@gregorek.c…

      John Salverda

      11:49 (27 minutes ago)

      to me

      Dear Michael,

      I’m sorry but I have no explanation that can make this obvious inconsistency conform to the rest of the story. There are many places where the Greek myths coincide with the Scriptures, but there are even more differences between them. You may just as well ask; How could Atlas be Adam if he had a brother (Prometheus) who created mankind out of clay, and another brother (Epimetheus) who was married to the first woman? Or; Why is Atlas never referred to as the first man? Occasionally the differences can tell us more than the similarities do (the Greeks still thought that men and women were created separately, first a man and then a woman, and it was she who introduced evil into the world). It is evident that the Greek myths do not accurately recount the Scriptural narrative. I think that it is fair to say that some degree of accuracy was lost to the Greeks in trying to fit all of the varied, mainly Eastern, stories into its one big system of mythology (they seem to require that everyone be related in one way or another).

      Now, as to why I consider Iapetus to be recognizable as Japheth (The similarity between the names is noteworthy, but it’s not just the likeness between the names). Noah preached the God of Heaven; thus, Noah being deified, it was as this God. The Greeks called him “Ouranos,” and Iapetus was one of his sons. Scripturally, Japheth is portrayed as the progenitor of the Caucasian races. While Iapetus was the father of, the first, and arguably, the most famous, “Caucasian” who ever lived! Prometheus. It is difficult indeed, to picture Prometheus as the creator of all mankind but, perhaps it was true, that he was (merely) the “procreator,” of a certain, “race,” of mankind, the Caucasians, who, once again, can be traced back to his father, the Greek Iapetus. Why are White folks named after the well known mountain of Prometheus, Mount Caucasia?

      Furthermore, there was a group of People who were known to the Greeks as the, “Leucosyri,” or the “White Syrians,” they lived in the land, that the Persians called “Cappadocia.” Once again, White People are associated with, this time the Persian form of the name, Japheth. (The Hebrews say, “Japheth,” the Latins say, “Gepetto,” and the Persians, “Cappado”) Given the Biblical list in the family of nations at Gen. 10, and compare this with the location of these nations in the Assyrian inscriptions, one wonders why Cappadocia isn’t immediately recognized as being named after Japheth. Meshech, Tubal, Gomer, Ashkenaz, and Togarmah, (if Togarmah truly is Armenia,) are all contiguous with Cappadocia. The Greek form, Iapetus, is most like the Hebrew in pronunciation, and as the father of Caucasians these two at least must be identified.

      Now Michael, I will offer a theory, purely speculative on my part, as to why these particular stories, with highly suspicious, apparently Scriptural motifs (the Adamic Atlas, the Messianic Prometheus, and the Eve-like Pandora) have been appended onto the family of Iapetus. Perhaps the Greeks saw their Iapetus in much the same way that the Hebrews saw Japheth, as some kind of geographical, or ethnic/linguistic, classification (ie. Armenian, Caucasian, or Indo-European). And they simply saw these specific myths as related, as all coming from the same place or group, and therefore categorized (as we do when we say “Japhetic”) by making them to be “sons” of Iapetus. As to why these, usually thought to be Semitic, Hebrew stories, should be classified as “Japhetic” by the Greeks, I hesitate to speculate. Perhaps it is because Noah and his family were associated with Ararat (Armenia), or because Joppa (a main point of departure for Greek immigration and the main seaport for Jerusalem) was supposed to be founded by and named after Japheth, or just a general association between Japhetics and Semites (as in Genesis 9:27), I’m really not prepared to say.

      Anyway, thanks for the question and interest in my work. -John R. Salverda

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